Blanket Appeal Part 2 – Replacing

Time for Part 2 of Blanket Appeal

In Part 1, I removed an old Monogram from a very loose weave, loopy Blanket so that I could replace it with a new Monogram. Time to show you the Replacement Monogram!

Before & After:

I know the blues are different but trust me, the blankets are the same. The pictures were taken in different rooms with different cameras.

Digitizing:

I used the same technique on this Blanket that I used in the Posts on Christmas Stockings and “Busy” Fabric. I created the Monogram first and then created an Outline of the Monogram that followed the shape of the Monogram. I made two copies of this Outline and Filled each with a large gap between the lines of stitching. I reversed the Angles of the two Outlines so that the stitches formed a CrossHatch pattern. I placed the Monogram on top of these two Outlines so that it would stitch last. I did not put a Satin Border around these two Outlines because I did not want to call attention to them on the finished Blanket. I wanted the Monogram to be the “Star of the Show” and the CrossHatch stitches to recede into the background and just do their job – hold down those blanket loops so my Monogram would not sink down into them or be “eaten” by them over time and washing.

 

Hooping:

I used Black Tearaway instead of White under the Blanket so any edges or fibers left behind after tearing would blend in better with the Blue Blanket. I used a Black Bobbin Thread so that it also would blend in visually with the Dark Blue of the Blanket when viewed from the back. I used a Magnetic Mighty Hoop so that the thickness of the Blanket was not an issue! Mighty Hoops work beautifully with Towels, Carhartt Jackets, Purses, Bags, Quilts, etc.

I used a light weight Water Soluble Topping (WST or WSS) to help hold back the loops during the embroidery process. I Hoop this topping along with the Backing and Blanket so that it is tight against the top of the blanket rather than just Floating or laying it on top. When finished, this topping tears easily away from the edge of the CrossHatch Fill Stitches.

Results:

The CrossHatch Fill Stitches do their job, they hold back the loops and almost disappear into the background of the blanket, allowing the Monogram to really be the Star of the Show.

I used this same technique on a brown Towel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A picture is worth a Thousand Words!

I am a picture kind of person.

I take pictures with my cell phone of just about anything I want to remember – everything from your face to the fabric bolt I just bought so I can buy more of the exact fabric if I need it. I can also look back at the photo for content and care instructions.

FabricBought

This approach works really well for me when it comes to my Embroidery Designs. When stitching out a complicated, high color change design that I know I will be stitching again, it is nice to know that my Happy will know exactly which needles to use 6 months from now. Problem? Well the odds that I will have the same color spools on those needles six months from now are slim to none!

What to do? Take a picture!

Just lay the stitchout next to the spools and snap a quick picture. This shows me exactly which threads I used and what their locations were when I stitched out that design. I can also write a note with the date, design name and project/recipient next to the design and add that information to the picture as well.

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It is also helpful to lay the cones down and snap a picture of the bottom so I can see the exact color numbers used.

ThreadColorsUsed

In a shop environment, this can be a helpful approach to add to the files or folder for a customer job so that no matter who runs the job in the future, they can get it right!

Don’t forget the recipe either – you know, the stabilizer you used, the needle type (Ball Point, Sharp) and the needle size. Include anything in the notes that will insure that future runs for that customer will be as successful as the first.